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Black Huntington : an Appalachian story  Cover Image E-book E-book

Black Huntington : an Appalachian story

Record details

  • OCLC: on1085578555
  • ISBN: 025208442X
  • ISBN: 9780252084423
  • ISBN: 025204259X
  • ISBN: 9780252042591
  • ISBN: 0252051432
  • ISBN: 9780252051432
  • Physical Description: 1 online resource
    remote
  • Published: Urbana :University of Illinois Press,[2019]
  • Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, [2019]

Content descriptions

Note: Significant Revision of the author's thesis (doctoral)--Ohio State University, 2009, titled Race, river, and the railroad : Black Huntington, West Virginia, 1871-1929.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents: The African American experience in Cabell County, Virginia/West Virginia, 1825-1870 -- The "grapevine telegraph": post-emancipation black community and early black migrant influx, 1865-1871 -- Into the crucible: the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad and the black industrial worker, 1870-1900 -- Community, race, and class: black settlement patterns, 1871-early 1900s -- Institutional development, public space, and political aspiration in early Huntington, 1870-early 1900s -- Spreading our wings: Afro-Huntingtonian progress during the era of "benevolent segregation."
Summary: "This project explores the experiences of black migrants and residents in Huntington, West Virginia, during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Founded as a transshipment station by financier Collis P. Huntington for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad in 1871, Huntington grew from a nondescript village to the state's most populated city, with the second largest black population in the state, by 1930. Its burgeoning economy and comparatively tolerant racial climate attracted increasing numbers of black migrants drawn to the socio-cultural and economic opportunities for African Americans not found further south: opportunities deriving both from railroad development and from Huntington's attendant rise as a commercial, manufacturing, and industrial center. Yet, by the early twentieth-century black aspirations became increasingly constrained as white Huntingtonians embraced and implemented the tenets of Jim Crowism. Fain documents the purposeful nature of black agency in the migratory process, the consolidation of Huntington's black working-class, and Afro-Huntingtonians' adaptive techniques and strategies--the strength of kin and social networks, gainful employment, institutional development, property acquisition, and legal challenges--used to confront the manifestations of segregation in an evolving urban-industrial southern environment. While Fain argues that race, not class, served as the primary operative feature of the Afro-Huntingtonian experience, he documents the development of class fissures within black Huntington, particularly as the rise of a professional class during the late-nineteenth and early twentieth century challenged the status quo of white Huntingtonians and complicated black aspirations"-- Provided by publisher.
Subject: Migration, Internal -- United States -- History -- 20th century
Migration, Internal -- United States -- History -- 19th century
African Americans -- Migrations -- History -- 20th century
African Americans -- Migrations -- History -- 19th century
African Americans -- West Virginia -- Huntington -- Social conditions -- 20th century
African Americans -- West Virginia -- Huntington -- Social conditions -- 19th century
African Americans -- West Virginia -- Huntington -- History -- 20th century
African Americans -- West Virginia -- Huntington -- History -- 19th century

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1001 . ‡aFain, Cicero M. ‡cIII, ‡d1958- ‡eauthor.
24510. ‡aBlack Huntington : ‡ban Appalachian story / ‡cCicero M. Fain III.
264 1. ‡aUrbana : ‡bUniversity of Illinois Press, ‡c[2019]
300 . ‡a1 online resource
336 . ‡atext ‡btxt ‡2rdacontent
337 . ‡acomputer ‡bc ‡2rdamedia
338 . ‡aonline resource ‡bcr ‡2rdacarrier
520 . ‡a"This project explores the experiences of black migrants and residents in Huntington, West Virginia, during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Founded as a transshipment station by financier Collis P. Huntington for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad in 1871, Huntington grew from a nondescript village to the state's most populated city, with the second largest black population in the state, by 1930. Its burgeoning economy and comparatively tolerant racial climate attracted increasing numbers of black migrants drawn to the socio-cultural and economic opportunities for African Americans not found further south: opportunities deriving both from railroad development and from Huntington's attendant rise as a commercial, manufacturing, and industrial center. Yet, by the early twentieth-century black aspirations became increasingly constrained as white Huntingtonians embraced and implemented the tenets of Jim Crowism. Fain documents the purposeful nature of black agency in the migratory process, the consolidation of Huntington's black working-class, and Afro-Huntingtonians' adaptive techniques and strategies--the strength of kin and social networks, gainful employment, institutional development, property acquisition, and legal challenges--used to confront the manifestations of segregation in an evolving urban-industrial southern environment. While Fain argues that race, not class, served as the primary operative feature of the Afro-Huntingtonian experience, he documents the development of class fissures within black Huntington, particularly as the rise of a professional class during the late-nineteenth and early twentieth century challenged the status quo of white Huntingtonians and complicated black aspirations"-- ‡cProvided by publisher.
500 . ‡aSignificant Revision of the author's thesis (doctoral)--Ohio State University, 2009, titled Race, river, and the railroad : Black Huntington, West Virginia, 1871-1929.
504 . ‡aIncludes bibliographical references and index.
5050 . ‡aThe African American experience in Cabell County, Virginia/West Virginia, 1825-1870 -- The "grapevine telegraph": post-emancipation black community and early black migrant influx, 1865-1871 -- Into the crucible: the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad and the black industrial worker, 1870-1900 -- Community, race, and class: black settlement patterns, 1871-early 1900s -- Institutional development, public space, and political aspiration in early Huntington, 1870-early 1900s -- Spreading our wings: Afro-Huntingtonian progress during the era of "benevolent segregation."
590 . ‡aEBSCO eBook Academic Comprehensive Collection North America
650 0. ‡aAfrican Americans ‡zWest Virginia ‡zHuntington ‡xHistory ‡y19th century.
650 0. ‡aAfrican Americans ‡zWest Virginia ‡zHuntington ‡xHistory ‡y20th century.
650 0. ‡aAfrican Americans ‡zWest Virginia ‡zHuntington ‡xSocial conditions ‡y19th century.
650 0. ‡aAfrican Americans ‡zWest Virginia ‡zHuntington ‡xSocial conditions ‡y20th century.
650 0. ‡aAfrican Americans ‡xMigrations ‡xHistory ‡y19th century.
650 0. ‡aAfrican Americans ‡xMigrations ‡xHistory ‡y20th century.
650 0. ‡aMigration, Internal ‡zUnited States ‡xHistory ‡y19th century.
650 0. ‡aMigration, Internal ‡zUnited States ‡xHistory ‡y20th century.
77608. ‡iPrint version: ‡aFain, Cicero M. III, 1958- ‡tBlack Huntington. ‡dUrbana : University of Illinois Press, [2019] ‡z9780252051432 ‡w(DLC) 2019005745
77608. ‡iPrint version: ‡aFain, Cicero M. III, 1958- ‡tBlack Huntington. ‡dUrbana : University of Illinois Press, [2019] ‡z9780252042591 ‡z025204259X ‡w(DLC) 2019001712 ‡w(OCoLC)1057377229
85640. ‡uhttps://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?authtype=shib&custid=asburyth&direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&AN=2098298 ‡yOnline access for Asbury Seminary students, faculty, and staff ‡9ATS ‡3Electronic copy from EBSCO Subscriptions ‡7ebsco_academic
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